Category: Engineering

Trando Med

Trando Med will attend MEDICA 2017 in the Dusseldorf Germany from 13-16 November 2017. The booth is Hall 13 Booth F 9-05

Carol Malnati

“- I wanted to be someone that encouraged young women to get involved in math, science, and engineering.”

Today, she’s doing just that.

As a product development engineer in the Medtronic cardiovascular division, Carol has been doing what she loves for more than 25 years. She provided critical technical expertise for the company’s first implantable cardioverter defibrillator and continues to collaborate with engineering teams and physicians to find new ways of doing things.

But on top of her day job, she has taken on another commitment – overseeing the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Initiative at the company.

Beginning in the spring of 2017, Medtronic introduced another opportunity that taps into an often overlooked talent pool.  Careers 2.0 is a “returnship” program designed to provide paid internships for female engineers looking to get back into STEM-related careers. Research suggests close to 25 percent of women in engineering careers leave the industry by age 30, citing work culture or family commitments.

“This is a way to bring these talented women back into our technical and managerial ranks,” says Carol. “We are very excited about providing this amazing pool of talent an opportunity at Medtronic.”

“Overall, I want to inspire women,” says Carol. “Whatever your passion is; clean air, fighting hunger, or improving healthcare. Behind the biggest challenges of humanity, there’s an engineer working to find a solution.”

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Surgical Planning and 3D Printed Hearts

Alistair Phillips, MD, who is the Co-Chair for the American College of Cardiology, Surgeons Section tells about some of the impacts he has personally experienced using 3D printing in surgical settings as his participation in the 3DHEART program:

“The clinical trial is particularly exciting as it targets specific cases in which understanding of the anatomy will greatly enhance the surgical approach. A 3D printed replica of a patient’s heart will be created as part of the inclusion criteria to be in the study.Using 3D printing gave a better understanding of the Hybrid procedure, and allowed us to perform pulmonary valve replacement with a minimally invasive approach avoiding conventional method that required open-heart surgery. After coming to Cedars-Sinai we refined the pre-ventricular approach by utilizing a 3D printed models of patients’ hearts. We were able to simulate the implant into the right ventricular outflow tract.

Every surgeon is different. The education, experience, aptitudes, and attitude we bring to each equally nuanced and varied patient span an almost limitless spectrum and inform how we may utilize 3D printing for the benefit of our patients. The elegance of 3D printing is that it can create the individualized tools spanning this spectrum.

That said, however, what is not negotiable is the veracity of the models that we are receiving. Various materials and their corresponding colouring or rigidity may serve different functions in the hands of different surgeons, but ultimately we must have the utmost confidence in the fidelity of the models we are utilizing for pre-surgical planning. The more realistic the model is both in anatomical and textural preciousness will greatly enhance the application.

In all honesty, I would advise each hospital to start by really understanding the value proposition 3D printing offers across all specialities and, the culture of their institution. The best way to get answers to these very nebulous, complicated, nuanced directives is by retaining an outside vendor to provide as much of the services as possible, from the proverbial soup to nuts.

The excitement around the 3DHEART clinical trial is so great because it is the first organized, large-scale attempt to collect evidence of the efficacies of 3D printing in the practice of medicine and delivery of healthcare, not only in terms of optimized patient outcomes but also with respect to lower costs. If we can get reimbursement for 3D models, it is without a doubt a game-changer in terms of the practice of medicine, and a life-changer for many of our patients.”

Source

Flow Testing Dynamic Systems with 3D Printed Patient-Specific Heart Models

Without the 3D printed models, we wouldn’t have been able to come up with a way to do the procedure in advance.

—C. HUIE LIN, M.D
Adult congenital and interventional cardiologist.

3D Print Bureau of Texas has partnered with physicians at Houston Methodist Hospital to create cardiac models for applications such as assessing the size and attachment site of a right atrial malignancy. Accurate physical replications of patient anatomy can even undergo testing in a dynamic system such as replicating the severity of aortic stenosis using flow testing.

3D Print Bureau of Texas also worked with Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center on a complex case involving a young patient born with a wide-open leaking pulmonary valve. The patient could not take blood transfusions and have been turned down by two medical centres concerned she would not make it through surgery.

With a 3D printed model of the patient’s heart, Lin devised a plan that required very little blood loss, which resulted in a successful operation for the little patient.

Source

The Impacts of Cardiac MRI on Congenital Surgical Results

On October 19 Koc University presented “The Impacts of Cardiac MRI on Congenital Heart Surgical Results,” a public symposium at Koc University Hospital Artlab Conference Hall that explored the benefits of cardiac MRI scans for depicting the congenital heart anatomy.

The symposium began with a presentation by Prof. Afksendiyos Kalangos. He was followed by renowned pediatric cardiovascular surgeons and cardiologists Prof. Atıf Akçevin, Prof. Alpay Çeliker, Prof. Aphrodite Tzifa, A. Professor Tijen Alkan- Bozkaya and the radiologists Dr. Serhat Aygün, A. Professor Özdil Başkan who presented their own experiences, demonstrating a vast range of approaches to defining the context.

Prof. Kerem Pekkan presented his studies with MRI imaging and cardiovascular mechanics in the cases of blood flow dynamics, biomaterial tests, patient-specific vascular materials and surgical planning for congenital heart diseases. His signified projects were one of the fascinating parts of the symposium for participants.

Heart Flow

Using data from a standard CT scan, the non-invasive HeartFlow Analysis creates a personalized 3D model of the coronary arteries and analyzes the impact that blockages have on blood flow. See the website: http://www.heartflow.com/

Starfish Medical – VivitroLabs – ProtomedLabs


Ece Tutsak – Banu Köse – Vincent Garitey

Mimics Innovation Course 2017

Materialise provided a Mimics Innovation Course on Soft Tissue.

This training was very informative and well-presented with all soft tissue samples, text book and datasets.

I used 3-Matic for the first time, and got confidence about many things about design and meshing. We could also discuss our own projects and could ask possible options of Mimics Innovation Suite.

Learning about the news about scripting possibilities to automate the workflow, and ADam (Materialise Anatomical Data Mining) for shape optimisation was encouraging.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us, Karen and Inés.

Thank you for the great help of Job.

Vivitro Pulse Duplicator Training in Protomed Labs

http://www.protomedlabs.com

It was really a great experience at  Protomed Labs in Aix-Marseille University. I really enjoyed learning about hydrodynamic testing requirements, Vivitro Pulse Duplicator, its calibration, flow testing, heart valve testing, and at the same time  practicing.

Thanks to Prof. Kerem Pekkan for suggesting this training for Ece Tutsak and me.

I would like to express my sincere thanks and gratitude to  Karim Mouneimne and Vincent Garitey for all the kind care they took, regarding the training, sharing their expertise to us, the  detail notes, all the answers whenever required etc. in Protomed Labs.

I hopefully will be able to implement it further into my field.  This got me inspired and ready to go!

Advances in Cardiac Imaging

While cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered an excellent imaging modality for the heart, offering highly detailed soft tissue anatomical imaging as well as functional assessments, it only makes up about 5 percent of all MRI scans in the United States. This is in part due to the expense, time involved and the complexity in completing these scans and reading them. There were two software innovations that may help increase the use of cardiac MRI by reducing its complexity.

To read the entire article, go to www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-cardiac-imaging-rsna-2016.

At RSNA 2015, Arterys introduced a package of advanced cardiac MRI visualization and quantification software that automates a lot of the processes involved. It also uses a cloud-based platform that allows access to a large amount of computing power needed to process cardiac cine functional data in real time. The software includes 4-D Flow and 2-D phase contrast workflows, and cardiac function measurements. The software is the first clinically available cardiovascular solution that delivers cloud-based, real-time processing of images with resolutions previously unattainable. The company gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance in November 2016 and showed several new advancements at RSNA 2016. Arterys is partnering with GE Healthcare to introduce the software on the Signa MRI systems under the GE name of ViosWorks. However, Arterys said it has aspirations to be a software OEM for several MRI vendors. An additional introduction was Arterys? regurgitation evaluation software that offers several ways to view regurgitation, which has traditionally been difficult to assess on MRI. One view visualizes blood flow velocities with arrows to show direction of flow and a color code to show the speed of the flow. It presents very similar to cardiac ultrasound color flow Doppler. The software can help identify regurgitation jets, vortices and sheer wall stresses, and offers automated quantification. In cardiovascular research, sheer stress evaluation has become a big area of interest because it is believed these stresses may play a role in the formation of atherosclerosis, the degradation of heart valve function, and possibly play a role in the progression of heart failure. So, Arterys also introduced a research sheer stress analysis software package.

- DAVE FORNELL

To read the entire article, go to www.dicardiology.com/article/advances-cardiac-imaging-rsna-2016.

İTÜ

I could have a chance to give a seminar about my research field at Istanbul Technical University.

Thanks to the faculty in The School of Physics Engineering for their sociable audience and fruitful discussions.

Special thanks to Özgür Akarsu and Sevtap Yildiz Özbek for the generous invitation and their kind hospitality.


Link

Windkessel plus colours ;)

I know why I’d rather CFD. Because it has colours. Windkessel analogy has not.

Link

ICPT – GEFIK 2016

I had chance to present my works to authors and answer the questions of young curious physicisits at GEFIK2016 in Ege University. Discussing about medical physics and classical mechanics with physicists was a peerless experience.

3D Printed Aorta

A pediatric aorta model reconstructed from the 3D CT images.

‘Go with the flow’ by Victoria Stoll

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) announced the winners of its annual ?Reflections of Research? image competition, reflecting the charity?s research into heart and circulatory disease.
The winning image ? titled ?Go with the flow,? by Victoria Stoll, a BHF-funded researcher at the University of Oxford ? captures the blood flowing within an adult heart frozen in time. Blood flows within the main pumping chambers (ventricles) of the heart and the vessels leaving the heart. The blue flow is blood that lacks oxygen and is travelling to the lungs. The red flow is blood that has been through the lungs and received oxygen and is now ready to be pumped around the body.
Stoll is using this type of imaging, four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to look at the blood flow in four dimensions within the hearts of people with heart failure, whose hearts are not pumping effectively. She has already found that in people with severe heart failure the blood flows around the heart in a more disordered and disrupted pattern.

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ISCOMS – Faculty of Medical Sciences- Groningen University

Interactive Surgical Operation

‘Lauded’


Cardiovascular

Anatomical Modeling & 3D Printing Meeting with 4C Medikal

PRINT THYSELF

This sort of procedure is becoming more and more common among doctors and medical researchers. Almost every day, I receive an e-mail from my hospital?s press office describing how yet another colleague is using a 3-D printer to create an intricately realistic surgical model?of a particular patient?s mitral valve, or finger, or optic nerve?to practice on before the actual operation. Surgeons are implanting 3-D-printed stents, prosthetics, and replacement segments of human skull. The exponents of 3-D printing contend that the technology is making manufacturing more democratic; the things we are choosing to print are becoming ever more personal and intimate. This appears to be even more true in medicine: increasingly, what we are printing is ourselves.

Source: Newyorker

Measure Your Blood Flow

The inventors of the new ?epidermal electronic? sensor system say it is ready for use in a clinical setting, specifically for monitoring skin health, for example in patients who have recently had skin grafts. They say down the road it may also be possible to use it inside the body. In a recent demonstration, the researchers showed that the device can record accurate data from human subjects about the flow of blood in larger vessels, specifically veins in the forearm, as well as in the network of tiny vessels near the surface of the skin.

Compared with state-of-the-art methods for noninvasively measuring blood flow, which rely on optical systems or ultrasound technology, the new sensor is much simpler and less expensive, says John Rogers, one of the inventors and a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More importantly, he says, it is much less sensitive to motion thanks to the way it ?intimately laminates? to the skin.

Characteristics of the blood flow in any given tissue are a good indicator of that tissue?s health. Some conditions, like infection and inflammation, can lead to an increase in local blood flow, whereas others, like atherosclerosis, heart failure, and diabetes, can cause a decrease. If doctors could precisely and even continuously monitor this flow, they could better tailor care to individual patients and conditions.

Source