Category: Cerrahi

Virtual Physiological Human Conference 2018 / Zaragoza

Conference Web Link

8th World Congress of Biomechanics / Pekkan Lab

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Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital / Utrecht Sessions

3 daags kindercardiologie TGA symposium

UMC Utrecht

Optimizing your workflow in the Mimics Innovation Suite

The Mimics Innovation Suite (MIS) allows you to automate your workflows, potentially saving a lot of time, achieving more consistency, and reducing repetitive work and human error. That is an easy thing to say, but if you do not have much experience with scripting, we all know that it can be tough to get started. If you want to speed up your learning curve and get a head start, then this could be an interesting training for you.

Topics will include:

Basics of Optimizing your Workflow in Mimics 21 and 3-matic 13
How to write your first scripts
Introduction to Python
Hands-on training exercises for creating planning workflows (e.g. loading datasets, performing basic segmentation steps, landmarking, creating anatomical coordinate systems, designing custom implants)

‘Lauded’


Cardiovascular

Trando Med

Trando Med will attend MEDICA 2017 in the Dusseldorf Germany from 13-16 November 2017. The booth is Hall 13 Booth F 9-05

Surgical Planning and 3D Printed Hearts

Alistair Phillips, MD, who is the Co-Chair for the American College of Cardiology, Surgeons Section tells about some of the impacts he has personally experienced using 3D printing in surgical settings as his participation in the 3DHEART program:

“The clinical trial is particularly exciting as it targets specific cases in which understanding of the anatomy will greatly enhance the surgical approach. A 3D printed replica of a patient’s heart will be created as part of the inclusion criteria to be in the study.Using 3D printing gave a better understanding of the Hybrid procedure, and allowed us to perform pulmonary valve replacement with a minimally invasive approach avoiding conventional method that required open-heart surgery. After coming to Cedars-Sinai we refined the pre-ventricular approach by utilizing a 3D printed models of patients’ hearts. We were able to simulate the implant into the right ventricular outflow tract.

Every surgeon is different. The education, experience, aptitudes, and attitude we bring to each equally nuanced and varied patient span an almost limitless spectrum and inform how we may utilize 3D printing for the benefit of our patients. The elegance of 3D printing is that it can create the individualized tools spanning this spectrum.

That said, however, what is not negotiable is the veracity of the models that we are receiving. Various materials and their corresponding colouring or rigidity may serve different functions in the hands of different surgeons, but ultimately we must have the utmost confidence in the fidelity of the models we are utilizing for pre-surgical planning. The more realistic the model is both in anatomical and textural preciousness will greatly enhance the application.

In all honesty, I would advise each hospital to start by really understanding the value proposition 3D printing offers across all specialities and, the culture of their institution. The best way to get answers to these very nebulous, complicated, nuanced directives is by retaining an outside vendor to provide as much of the services as possible, from the proverbial soup to nuts.

The excitement around the 3DHEART clinical trial is so great because it is the first organized, large-scale attempt to collect evidence of the efficacies of 3D printing in the practice of medicine and delivery of healthcare, not only in terms of optimized patient outcomes but also with respect to lower costs. If we can get reimbursement for 3D models, it is without a doubt a game-changer in terms of the practice of medicine, and a life-changer for many of our patients.”

Source

The Impacts of Cardiac MRI on Congenital Surgical Results

On October 19 Koc University presented “The Impacts of Cardiac MRI on Congenital Heart Surgical Results,” a public symposium at Koc University Hospital Artlab Conference Hall that explored the benefits of cardiac MRI scans for depicting the congenital heart anatomy.

The symposium began with a presentation by Prof. Afksendiyos Kalangos. He was followed by renowned pediatric cardiovascular surgeons and cardiologists Prof. Atıf Akçevin, Prof. Alpay Çeliker, Prof. Aphrodite Tzifa, A. Professor Tijen Alkan- Bozkaya and the radiologists Dr. Serhat Aygün, A. Professor Özdil Başkan who presented their own experiences, demonstrating a vast range of approaches to defining the context.

Prof. Kerem Pekkan presented his studies with MRI imaging and cardiovascular mechanics in the cases of blood flow dynamics, biomaterial tests, patient-specific vascular materials and surgical planning for congenital heart diseases. His signified projects were one of the fascinating parts of the symposium for participants.

Heart Flow

Using data from a standard CT scan, the non-invasive HeartFlow Analysis creates a personalized 3D model of the coronary arteries and analyzes the impact that blockages have on blood flow. See the website: http://www.heartflow.com/

Aorta Aneurysm

Artifical Artery 1955

ISCOMS 2017 at University of Groningen

Many thanks to University Medical Center Groningen for the oral sessions and workshops of 3D Lab, LVAD treatment, Dissection of Brain, CABG treatment, IV Injections and Nuclear Medicine.

Knee Anatomy – 3D Slicer

I tried to show the knee anatomy with the MRI dataset of 3D Slicer (Harvard Medical School /Brigham and Women’s Hospital / Surgical Planning Laboratory)

Youtube

ICPT – GEFIK 2016

I had chance to present my works to authors and answer the questions of young curious physicisits at GEFIK2016 in Ege University. Discussing about medical physics and classical mechanics with physicists was a peerless experience.

ISCOMS – Faculty of Medical Sciences- Groningen University

Interactive Surgical Operation

ISCOMS 2016

Workshop – Anatomy of Thef Heart with Michiel E. Erasmus MD PhD – Faculty of Medical Sciences- Groningen University

PRINT THYSELF

This sort of procedure is becoming more and more common among doctors and medical researchers. Almost every day, I receive an e-mail from my hospital?s press office describing how yet another colleague is using a 3-D printer to create an intricately realistic surgical model?of a particular patient?s mitral valve, or finger, or optic nerve?to practice on before the actual operation. Surgeons are implanting 3-D-printed stents, prosthetics, and replacement segments of human skull. The exponents of 3-D printing contend that the technology is making manufacturing more democratic; the things we are choosing to print are becoming ever more personal and intimate. This appears to be even more true in medicine: increasingly, what we are printing is ourselves.

Source: Newyorker

Cardio-Pulmonary By-Pass Circuit

I simplify by drawing.

Hemodyn

Hemodyn, the first cardiovascular mechanics and surgical planning company of Turkey is taking place in StartUp Istanbul 2015.

Hemodyn is assisting the surgeons in the diagnosis and surgery planning of the congenital heart diseases in The Incubation Office of Koc University.

Hemodyn Team has always been an invariable place for my research vision. I want to thank to Kerem Pekkan, Şenol Pişkin and Volkan Tuncay by means of this event.

Link

3D Printing for Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeons

Having worked in product development for the past few years, Dr. Enrique Garcia had seen what 3D printers were capable of and began investigating the possibilities for creating models for pediatric cardiologists to use before an operation. She began by asking surgeons from around the country what they thought of the idea. To say that their response was overwhelmingly positive is an understatement. The value of this idea was immediately apparent.

?Pediatric heart surgery is the hardest thing that I can imagine a person doing. A surgeon doesn?t know what he?s going to see until he opens a child?s chest. Every heart is different and every cardiopathy is different,? said Garcia. ?A baby?s heart is the size of a walnut, and surgeons need to go in and move around structures that are as small and thin as a human hair; and they?re doing it with their own two hands. And all of this is occurring against a ticking clock.?
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?Having something in your hands, and being able to turn it any way you want, and to be able to cut and open it up and see the inside; and to be able to physically hold it, to feel it, is something that can?t be replicated in a computer.?

Read More in the source.