Category: Biomaterials

Trando Med

Trando Med will attend MEDICA 2017 in the Dusseldorf Germany from 13-16 November 2017. The booth is Hall 13 Booth F 9-05

Carol Malnati

“- I wanted to be someone that encouraged young women to get involved in math, science, and engineering.”

Today, she’s doing just that.

As a product development engineer in the Medtronic cardiovascular division, Carol has been doing what she loves for more than 25 years. She provided critical technical expertise for the company’s first implantable cardioverter defibrillator and continues to collaborate with engineering teams and physicians to find new ways of doing things.

But on top of her day job, she has taken on another commitment – overseeing the Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Initiative at the company.

Beginning in the spring of 2017, Medtronic introduced another opportunity that taps into an often overlooked talent pool.  Careers 2.0 is a “returnship” program designed to provide paid internships for female engineers looking to get back into STEM-related careers. Research suggests close to 25 percent of women in engineering careers leave the industry by age 30, citing work culture or family commitments.

“This is a way to bring these talented women back into our technical and managerial ranks,” says Carol. “We are very excited about providing this amazing pool of talent an opportunity at Medtronic.”

“Overall, I want to inspire women,” says Carol. “Whatever your passion is; clean air, fighting hunger, or improving healthcare. Behind the biggest challenges of humanity, there’s an engineer working to find a solution.”

Source

Surgical Planning and 3D Printed Hearts

Alistair Phillips, MD, who is the Co-Chair for the American College of Cardiology, Surgeons Section tells about some of the impacts he has personally experienced using 3D printing in surgical settings as his participation in the 3DHEART program:

“The clinical trial is particularly exciting as it targets specific cases in which understanding of the anatomy will greatly enhance the surgical approach. A 3D printed replica of a patient’s heart will be created as part of the inclusion criteria to be in the study.Using 3D printing gave a better understanding of the Hybrid procedure, and allowed us to perform pulmonary valve replacement with a minimally invasive approach avoiding conventional method that required open-heart surgery. After coming to Cedars-Sinai we refined the pre-ventricular approach by utilizing a 3D printed models of patients’ hearts. We were able to simulate the implant into the right ventricular outflow tract.

Every surgeon is different. The education, experience, aptitudes, and attitude we bring to each equally nuanced and varied patient span an almost limitless spectrum and inform how we may utilize 3D printing for the benefit of our patients. The elegance of 3D printing is that it can create the individualized tools spanning this spectrum.

That said, however, what is not negotiable is the veracity of the models that we are receiving. Various materials and their corresponding colouring or rigidity may serve different functions in the hands of different surgeons, but ultimately we must have the utmost confidence in the fidelity of the models we are utilizing for pre-surgical planning. The more realistic the model is both in anatomical and textural preciousness will greatly enhance the application.

In all honesty, I would advise each hospital to start by really understanding the value proposition 3D printing offers across all specialities and, the culture of their institution. The best way to get answers to these very nebulous, complicated, nuanced directives is by retaining an outside vendor to provide as much of the services as possible, from the proverbial soup to nuts.

The excitement around the 3DHEART clinical trial is so great because it is the first organized, large-scale attempt to collect evidence of the efficacies of 3D printing in the practice of medicine and delivery of healthcare, not only in terms of optimized patient outcomes but also with respect to lower costs. If we can get reimbursement for 3D models, it is without a doubt a game-changer in terms of the practice of medicine, and a life-changer for many of our patients.”

Source

The Impacts of Cardiac MRI on Congenital Surgical Results

On October 19 Koc University presented “The Impacts of Cardiac MRI on Congenital Heart Surgical Results,” a public symposium at Koc University Hospital Artlab Conference Hall that explored the benefits of cardiac MRI scans for depicting the congenital heart anatomy.

The symposium began with a presentation by Prof. Afksendiyos Kalangos. He was followed by renowned pediatric cardiovascular surgeons and cardiologists Prof. Atıf Akçevin, Prof. Alpay Çeliker, Prof. Aphrodite Tzifa, A. Professor Tijen Alkan- Bozkaya and the radiologists Dr. Serhat Aygün, A. Professor Özdil Başkan who presented their own experiences, demonstrating a vast range of approaches to defining the context.

Prof. Kerem Pekkan presented his studies with MRI imaging and cardiovascular mechanics in the cases of blood flow dynamics, biomaterial tests, patient-specific vascular materials and surgical planning for congenital heart diseases. His signified projects were one of the fascinating parts of the symposium for participants.

Artifical Artery 1955

ISCOMS 2017 at University of Groningen

Many thanks to University Medical Center Groningen for the oral sessions and workshops of 3D Lab, LVAD treatment, Dissection of Brain, CABG treatment, IV Injections and Nuclear Medicine.

Starfish Medical – VivitroLabs – ProtomedLabs


Ece Tutsak – Banu Köse – Vincent Garitey

Mimics Innovation Course 2017

Materialise provided a Mimics Innovation Course on Soft Tissue.

This training was very informative and well-presented with all soft tissue samples, text book and datasets.

I used 3-Matic for the first time, and got confidence about many things about design and meshing. We could also discuss our own projects and could ask possible options of Mimics Innovation Suite.

Learning about the news about scripting possibilities to automate the workflow, and ADam (Materialise Anatomical Data Mining) for shape optimisation was encouraging.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us, Karen and Inés.

Thank you for the great help of Job.

3D Printed Aorta

A pediatric aorta model reconstructed from the 3D CT images.

ISCOMS – Faculty of Medical Sciences- Groningen University

Interactive Surgical Operation

Me in The Old Lab and The Oxygenator

Anatomical Modeling & 3D Printing Meeting with 4C Medikal

PRINT THYSELF

This sort of procedure is becoming more and more common among doctors and medical researchers. Almost every day, I receive an e-mail from my hospital?s press office describing how yet another colleague is using a 3-D printer to create an intricately realistic surgical model?of a particular patient?s mitral valve, or finger, or optic nerve?to practice on before the actual operation. Surgeons are implanting 3-D-printed stents, prosthetics, and replacement segments of human skull. The exponents of 3-D printing contend that the technology is making manufacturing more democratic; the things we are choosing to print are becoming ever more personal and intimate. This appears to be even more true in medicine: increasingly, what we are printing is ourselves.

Source: Newyorker

Measure Your Blood Flow

The inventors of the new ?epidermal electronic? sensor system say it is ready for use in a clinical setting, specifically for monitoring skin health, for example in patients who have recently had skin grafts. They say down the road it may also be possible to use it inside the body. In a recent demonstration, the researchers showed that the device can record accurate data from human subjects about the flow of blood in larger vessels, specifically veins in the forearm, as well as in the network of tiny vessels near the surface of the skin.

Compared with state-of-the-art methods for noninvasively measuring blood flow, which rely on optical systems or ultrasound technology, the new sensor is much simpler and less expensive, says John Rogers, one of the inventors and a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More importantly, he says, it is much less sensitive to motion thanks to the way it ?intimately laminates? to the skin.

Characteristics of the blood flow in any given tissue are a good indicator of that tissue?s health. Some conditions, like infection and inflammation, can lead to an increase in local blood flow, whereas others, like atherosclerosis, heart failure, and diabetes, can cause a decrease. If doctors could precisely and even continuously monitor this flow, they could better tailor care to individual patients and conditions.

Source

Hemodyn

Hemodyn, the first cardiovascular mechanics and surgical planning company of Turkey is taking place in StartUp Istanbul 2015.

Hemodyn is assisting the surgeons in the diagnosis and surgery planning of the congenital heart diseases in The Incubation Office of Koc University.

Hemodyn Team has always been an invariable place for my research vision. I want to thank to Kerem Pekkan, Şenol Pişkin and Volkan Tuncay by means of this event.

Link

3D Printing for Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeons

Having worked in product development for the past few years, Dr. Enrique Garcia had seen what 3D printers were capable of and began investigating the possibilities for creating models for pediatric cardiologists to use before an operation. She began by asking surgeons from around the country what they thought of the idea. To say that their response was overwhelmingly positive is an understatement. The value of this idea was immediately apparent.

?Pediatric heart surgery is the hardest thing that I can imagine a person doing. A surgeon doesn?t know what he?s going to see until he opens a child?s chest. Every heart is different and every cardiopathy is different,? said Garcia. ?A baby?s heart is the size of a walnut, and surgeons need to go in and move around structures that are as small and thin as a human hair; and they?re doing it with their own two hands. And all of this is occurring against a ticking clock.?
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?Having something in your hands, and being able to turn it any way you want, and to be able to cut and open it up and see the inside; and to be able to physically hold it, to feel it, is something that can?t be replicated in a computer.?

Read More in the source.

8th Euro Biotechnology Congress August 18-20, 2015 Frankfurt

The special session for the women in the field of cardiovascular surgery – The 64th Istanbul ESCVS

International Congress of the European Society for Cardiovascular and Endovascular Surgery (ESCVS) will be held on March 26th – 29th, 2015 in İstanbul in collaboration with International Congress of Update Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery.

The congress scientific program includes a session for women in cardiovascular surgery which will be held on March 28th.

Abstract Submission Deadline
December 22, 2014
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Notification of Abstract Acceptance
January 2, 2015
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Early Registration
until November 7, 2014

ESCVS 2015 Web Site

The Horizon for Mechanical Circulatory Support

Filmed at the 2014 STS Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida, this roundtable discussion focuses on mechanical circulatory support. John Kern moderates the discussion with Pavan Atluri and Francis Pagani. The panelists discuss mechanical circulatory support, LVAD therapy, and heart transplantation. The discussion concludes with thoughts on the future of mechanical circulatory support.

Source:  CTS

2014 AATS Cardiovascular Valve Symposium in İSTANBUL

The inaugural 2014 AATS Cardiovascular Valve Symposium will bring international leaders in adult, congenital, and adult-congenital heart valve disease as well as diseases of the ascending aorta together for three days to discuss the latest information regarding management guidelines, imaging, pathology, minimally invasive approaches, percutaneous approaches, surgical techniques, devices, and long term results. Faculty presentations of the latest available data, techniques, and state of the art reviews will be supplemented by comprehensive surgical video sessions. In addition, the program will include abstract presentations selected by the program committee from submitted original work on a wide range of topics. This innovative program will allow attendees at all levels to advance their knowledge in aortic and ascending aorta, mitral, pulmonary, and tricuspid valve disease across all age spectrums during this AATS Symposium in Istanbul.

Click here for details.

PROGRAM DIRECTORS

David H. Adams
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
New York, New York, USA

Sertac Cicek
Anadolu Medical Center
Istanbul, Turkey

Joseph S. Coselli
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas, USA

Pedro J. del Nido
Children’s Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts, USA