Category: Art

Trando Med

Trando Med will attend MEDICA 2017 in the Dusseldorf Germany from 13-16 November 2017. The booth is Hall 13 Booth F 9-05

Surgical Planning and 3D Printed Hearts

Alistair Phillips, MD, who is the Co-Chair for the American College of Cardiology, Surgeons Section tells about some of the impacts he has personally experienced using 3D printing in surgical settings as his participation in the 3DHEART program:

“The clinical trial is particularly exciting as it targets specific cases in which understanding of the anatomy will greatly enhance the surgical approach. A 3D printed replica of a patient’s heart will be created as part of the inclusion criteria to be in the study.Using 3D printing gave a better understanding of the Hybrid procedure, and allowed us to perform pulmonary valve replacement with a minimally invasive approach avoiding conventional method that required open-heart surgery. After coming to Cedars-Sinai we refined the pre-ventricular approach by utilizing a 3D printed models of patients’ hearts. We were able to simulate the implant into the right ventricular outflow tract.

Every surgeon is different. The education, experience, aptitudes, and attitude we bring to each equally nuanced and varied patient span an almost limitless spectrum and inform how we may utilize 3D printing for the benefit of our patients. The elegance of 3D printing is that it can create the individualized tools spanning this spectrum.

That said, however, what is not negotiable is the veracity of the models that we are receiving. Various materials and their corresponding colouring or rigidity may serve different functions in the hands of different surgeons, but ultimately we must have the utmost confidence in the fidelity of the models we are utilizing for pre-surgical planning. The more realistic the model is both in anatomical and textural preciousness will greatly enhance the application.

In all honesty, I would advise each hospital to start by really understanding the value proposition 3D printing offers across all specialities and, the culture of their institution. The best way to get answers to these very nebulous, complicated, nuanced directives is by retaining an outside vendor to provide as much of the services as possible, from the proverbial soup to nuts.

The excitement around the 3DHEART clinical trial is so great because it is the first organized, large-scale attempt to collect evidence of the efficacies of 3D printing in the practice of medicine and delivery of healthcare, not only in terms of optimized patient outcomes but also with respect to lower costs. If we can get reimbursement for 3D models, it is without a doubt a game-changer in terms of the practice of medicine, and a life-changer for many of our patients.”

Source

Aorta Aneurysm

If the human body were deduced to only the circulatory system..

Markos Kay partnered with Jan Kriwol, a Polish photographer who has an interest in optical illusion, in 2012 to begin their project, entitled Human After All. ”The biggest challenge for this project was creating an anatomical character that looked life-like and integrated with the real environment,” Kay tells Creators. “We spent a lot of time experimenting with different postures, and oftentimes we had to exaggerate the posture greatly so that it could translate visually with the deconstructed structure of the circulatory system.”

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HORST KIECHLE

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VasCollar (Vascular Collar)

I’ve just drown vessels to my collar. It looks better now.

For More  Drawords Stuff, Click Here.

Windkessel plus colours ;)

I know why I’d rather CFD. Because it has colours. Windkessel analogy has not.

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Double Aortic Arch

3D Printed Aorta

A pediatric aorta model reconstructed from the 3D CT images.

‘Go with the flow’ by Victoria Stoll

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) announced the winners of its annual ?Reflections of Research? image competition, reflecting the charity?s research into heart and circulatory disease.
The winning image ? titled ?Go with the flow,? by Victoria Stoll, a BHF-funded researcher at the University of Oxford ? captures the blood flowing within an adult heart frozen in time. Blood flows within the main pumping chambers (ventricles) of the heart and the vessels leaving the heart. The blue flow is blood that lacks oxygen and is travelling to the lungs. The red flow is blood that has been through the lungs and received oxygen and is now ready to be pumped around the body.
Stoll is using this type of imaging, four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to look at the blood flow in four dimensions within the hearts of people with heart failure, whose hearts are not pumping effectively. She has already found that in people with severe heart failure the blood flows around the heart in a more disordered and disrupted pattern.

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Inside A Blue Whale’s Heart

Many thanks to Bombay Segundo.

Source : Canadian Museum of Nature

Source: @Pickover

Pulmonary

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Anatomical Modeling & 3D Printing Meeting with 4C Medikal

PRINT THYSELF

This sort of procedure is becoming more and more common among doctors and medical researchers. Almost every day, I receive an e-mail from my hospital?s press office describing how yet another colleague is using a 3-D printer to create an intricately realistic surgical model?of a particular patient?s mitral valve, or finger, or optic nerve?to practice on before the actual operation. Surgeons are implanting 3-D-printed stents, prosthetics, and replacement segments of human skull. The exponents of 3-D printing contend that the technology is making manufacturing more democratic; the things we are choosing to print are becoming ever more personal and intimate. This appears to be even more true in medicine: increasingly, what we are printing is ourselves.

Source: Newyorker

Gigantic Human Organs Made of Glass


Modeling human anatomy. Isn’t it fabulous?

Read more.

Many thanks Sıla Yavuz for this pleasant link.

3D Printing for Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeons

Having worked in product development for the past few years, Dr. Enrique Garcia had seen what 3D printers were capable of and began investigating the possibilities for creating models for pediatric cardiologists to use before an operation. She began by asking surgeons from around the country what they thought of the idea. To say that their response was overwhelmingly positive is an understatement. The value of this idea was immediately apparent.

?Pediatric heart surgery is the hardest thing that I can imagine a person doing. A surgeon doesn?t know what he?s going to see until he opens a child?s chest. Every heart is different and every cardiopathy is different,? said Garcia. ?A baby?s heart is the size of a walnut, and surgeons need to go in and move around structures that are as small and thin as a human hair; and they?re doing it with their own two hands. And all of this is occurring against a ticking clock.?
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?Having something in your hands, and being able to turn it any way you want, and to be able to cut and open it up and see the inside; and to be able to physically hold it, to feel it, is something that can?t be replicated in a computer.?

Read More in the source.

ECVS Conference

It was  sensible showing 3D printed models when i was presenting my study.

MY TINY DIY HEART

Back to childhood:  I spend my time with play-dough ;)

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Computational Fluid Dynamics

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My Lab Drawings – II

A pulmonary artery. Actually this was the first step of my master thesis.