Category: Biosecience

Heart Flow

Using data from a standard CT scan, the non-invasive HeartFlow Analysis creates a personalized 3D model of the coronary arteries and analyzes the impact that blockages have on blood flow. See the website: http://www.heartflow.com/

Artifical Artery 1955

ISCOMS 2017 at University of Groningen

Many thanks to University Medical Center Groningen for the oral sessions and workshops of 3D Lab, LVAD treatment, Dissection of Brain, CABG treatment, IV Injections and Nuclear Medicine.

Starfish Medical – VivitroLabs – ProtomedLabs


Ece Tutsak – Banu Köse – Vincent Garitey

Mimics Innovation Course 2017

Materialise provided a Mimics Innovation Course on Soft Tissue.

This training was very informative and well-presented with all soft tissue samples, text book and datasets.

I used 3-Matic for the first time, and got confidence about many things about design and meshing. We could also discuss our own projects and could ask possible options of Mimics Innovation Suite.

Learning about the news about scripting possibilities to automate the workflow, and ADam (Materialise Anatomical Data Mining) for shape optimisation was encouraging.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us, Karen and Inés.

Thank you for the great help of Job.

Vivitro Pulse Duplicator Training in Protomed Labs

http://www.protomedlabs.com

It was really a great experience at  Protomed Labs in Aix-Marseille University. I really enjoyed learning about hydrodynamic testing requirements, Vivitro Pulse Duplicator, its calibration, flow testing, heart valve testing, and at the same time  practicing.

Thanks to Prof. Kerem Pekkan for suggesting this training for Ece Tutsak and me.

I would like to express my sincere thanks and gratitude to  Karim Mouneimne and Vincent Garitey for all the kind care they took, regarding the training, sharing their expertise to us, the  detail notes, all the answers whenever required etc. in Protomed Labs.

I hopefully will be able to implement it further into my field.  This got me inspired and ready to go!

20. National Liquid State Physics Symposium 16 December 2016

20. National Symposium on  Liquid State Physics was held in Piri Reis University.

The symposium was obtaining various studies about liquids as water and climate change, simulating strait systems, oceans, spin glass phases, liquid crystals, serum transferring,  swollen gells, GO composites, metals with  glass-like structure, super hidrophobic polistren and, biofluids {yes, this was mine ;) }.

It was an incontrovertible experience for me that i could meet new studies in the field and spend nameable times with  physics authors.

Many thanks to organizing comitee (especially to Gülşen Evingür) and Sevtap Yıldız Özbek.

The website of the symposium is here.

Windkessel plus colours ;)

I know why I’d rather CFD. Because it has colours. Windkessel analogy has not.

Link

ICPT – GEFIK 2016

I had chance to present my works to authors and answer the questions of young curious physicisits at GEFIK2016 in Ege University. Discussing about medical physics and classical mechanics with physicists was a peerless experience.

3D Printed Aorta

A pediatric aorta model reconstructed from the 3D CT images.

‘Go with the flow’ by Victoria Stoll

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) announced the winners of its annual ?Reflections of Research? image competition, reflecting the charity?s research into heart and circulatory disease.
The winning image ? titled ?Go with the flow,? by Victoria Stoll, a BHF-funded researcher at the University of Oxford ? captures the blood flowing within an adult heart frozen in time. Blood flows within the main pumping chambers (ventricles) of the heart and the vessels leaving the heart. The blue flow is blood that lacks oxygen and is travelling to the lungs. The red flow is blood that has been through the lungs and received oxygen and is now ready to be pumped around the body.
Stoll is using this type of imaging, four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to look at the blood flow in four dimensions within the hearts of people with heart failure, whose hearts are not pumping effectively. She has already found that in people with severe heart failure the blood flows around the heart in a more disordered and disrupted pattern.

More

ISCOMS – Faculty of Medical Sciences- Groningen University

Interactive Surgical Operation

ISCOMS 2016

Workshop – Anatomy of Thef Heart with Michiel E. Erasmus MD PhD – Faculty of Medical Sciences- Groningen University

Anatomical Modeling & 3D Printing Meeting with 4C Medikal

PRINT THYSELF

This sort of procedure is becoming more and more common among doctors and medical researchers. Almost every day, I receive an e-mail from my hospital?s press office describing how yet another colleague is using a 3-D printer to create an intricately realistic surgical model?of a particular patient?s mitral valve, or finger, or optic nerve?to practice on before the actual operation. Surgeons are implanting 3-D-printed stents, prosthetics, and replacement segments of human skull. The exponents of 3-D printing contend that the technology is making manufacturing more democratic; the things we are choosing to print are becoming ever more personal and intimate. This appears to be even more true in medicine: increasingly, what we are printing is ourselves.

Source: Newyorker

Cardio-Pulmonary By-Pass Circuit

I simplify by drawing.

Gigantic Human Organs Made of Glass


Modeling human anatomy. Isn’t it fabulous?

Read more.

Many thanks Sıla Yavuz for this pleasant link.

Hemodyn

Hemodyn, the first cardiovascular mechanics and surgical planning company of Turkey is taking place in StartUp Istanbul 2015.

Hemodyn is assisting the surgeons in the diagnosis and surgery planning of the congenital heart diseases in The Incubation Office of Koc University.

Hemodyn Team has always been an invariable place for my research vision. I want to thank to Kerem Pekkan, Şenol Pişkin and Volkan Tuncay by means of this event.

Link

3D Printing for Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeons

Having worked in product development for the past few years, Dr. Enrique Garcia had seen what 3D printers were capable of and began investigating the possibilities for creating models for pediatric cardiologists to use before an operation. She began by asking surgeons from around the country what they thought of the idea. To say that their response was overwhelmingly positive is an understatement. The value of this idea was immediately apparent.

?Pediatric heart surgery is the hardest thing that I can imagine a person doing. A surgeon doesn?t know what he?s going to see until he opens a child?s chest. Every heart is different and every cardiopathy is different,? said Garcia. ?A baby?s heart is the size of a walnut, and surgeons need to go in and move around structures that are as small and thin as a human hair; and they?re doing it with their own two hands. And all of this is occurring against a ticking clock.?
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?Having something in your hands, and being able to turn it any way you want, and to be able to cut and open it up and see the inside; and to be able to physically hold it, to feel it, is something that can?t be replicated in a computer.?

Read More in the source.

cSound

Researchers have created software that can model internal organs in ‘extreme 4D’.
The system, dubbed cSound, is currently being used by cardiologist Bijoy Khandheria, who has been fixing broken hearts for more than three decades.

Dr Khandheria describes the images as ‘exquisite’, and says it’s like opening up someone’s chest and watching their heart beat.’

‘Traditionally, ultrasound has allowed us to see the heart but not in as much detail as we might like,’ he said.
‘We used the signal to image the heart layer by layer, almost like a butcher using a knife, and then mentally splice the layers together to see the whole picture’.
Dr Khandheria and his colleagues at Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee, have recently started ‘extreme 4D’ software.
The images are so clear that it allows doctors to see how blood swirls around clots in arteries.
This can then be used to measure the severity of blood leakage around the valves and assess the damages.
‘It’s almost as if I took out the valve and started turning it with my hands,’ said Dr Khandheria.

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