‘Lauded’


Cardiovascular

Inside A Blue Whale’s Heart

Many thanks to Bombay Segundo.

Source : Canadian Museum of Nature

Source: @Pickover

Pulmonary

Link

Me in The Old Lab and The Oxygenator

Anatomical Modeling & 3D Printing Meeting with 4C Medikal

PRINT THYSELF

This sort of procedure is becoming more and more common among doctors and medical researchers. Almost every day, I receive an e-mail from my hospital?s press office describing how yet another colleague is using a 3-D printer to create an intricately realistic surgical model?of a particular patient?s mitral valve, or finger, or optic nerve?to practice on before the actual operation. Surgeons are implanting 3-D-printed stents, prosthetics, and replacement segments of human skull. The exponents of 3-D printing contend that the technology is making manufacturing more democratic; the things we are choosing to print are becoming ever more personal and intimate. This appears to be even more true in medicine: increasingly, what we are printing is ourselves.

Source: Newyorker

Cardio-Pulmonary By-Pass Circuit

I simplify by drawing.

Gigantic Human Organs Made of Glass


Modeling human anatomy. Isn’t it fabulous?

Read more.

Many thanks Sıla Yavuz for this pleasant link.

Measure Your Blood Flow

The inventors of the new ?epidermal electronic? sensor system say it is ready for use in a clinical setting, specifically for monitoring skin health, for example in patients who have recently had skin grafts. They say down the road it may also be possible to use it inside the body. In a recent demonstration, the researchers showed that the device can record accurate data from human subjects about the flow of blood in larger vessels, specifically veins in the forearm, as well as in the network of tiny vessels near the surface of the skin.

Compared with state-of-the-art methods for noninvasively measuring blood flow, which rely on optical systems or ultrasound technology, the new sensor is much simpler and less expensive, says John Rogers, one of the inventors and a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More importantly, he says, it is much less sensitive to motion thanks to the way it ?intimately laminates? to the skin.

Characteristics of the blood flow in any given tissue are a good indicator of that tissue?s health. Some conditions, like infection and inflammation, can lead to an increase in local blood flow, whereas others, like atherosclerosis, heart failure, and diabetes, can cause a decrease. If doctors could precisely and even continuously monitor this flow, they could better tailor care to individual patients and conditions.

Source

Hemodyn

Hemodyn, the first cardiovascular mechanics and surgical planning company of Turkey is taking place in StartUp Istanbul 2015.

Hemodyn is assisting the surgeons in the diagnosis and surgery planning of the congenital heart diseases in The Incubation Office of Koc University.

Hemodyn Team has always been an invariable place for my research vision. I want to thank to Kerem Pekkan, Şenol Pişkin and Volkan Tuncay by means of this event.

Link

3D Printing for Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeons

Having worked in product development for the past few years, Dr. Enrique Garcia had seen what 3D printers were capable of and began investigating the possibilities for creating models for pediatric cardiologists to use before an operation. She began by asking surgeons from around the country what they thought of the idea. To say that their response was overwhelmingly positive is an understatement. The value of this idea was immediately apparent.

?Pediatric heart surgery is the hardest thing that I can imagine a person doing. A surgeon doesn?t know what he?s going to see until he opens a child?s chest. Every heart is different and every cardiopathy is different,? said Garcia. ?A baby?s heart is the size of a walnut, and surgeons need to go in and move around structures that are as small and thin as a human hair; and they?re doing it with their own two hands. And all of this is occurring against a ticking clock.?
*
?Having something in your hands, and being able to turn it any way you want, and to be able to cut and open it up and see the inside; and to be able to physically hold it, to feel it, is something that can?t be replicated in a computer.?

Read More in the source.

cSound

Researchers have created software that can model internal organs in ‘extreme 4D’.
The system, dubbed cSound, is currently being used by cardiologist Bijoy Khandheria, who has been fixing broken hearts for more than three decades.

Dr Khandheria describes the images as ‘exquisite’, and says it’s like opening up someone’s chest and watching their heart beat.’

‘Traditionally, ultrasound has allowed us to see the heart but not in as much detail as we might like,’ he said.
‘We used the signal to image the heart layer by layer, almost like a butcher using a knife, and then mentally splice the layers together to see the whole picture’.
Dr Khandheria and his colleagues at Aurora St Luke’s Medical Center in Milwaukee, have recently started ‘extreme 4D’ software.
The images are so clear that it allows doctors to see how blood swirls around clots in arteries.
This can then be used to measure the severity of blood leakage around the valves and assess the damages.
‘It’s almost as if I took out the valve and started turning it with my hands,’ said Dr Khandheria.

Read more

Computing in Cardiology

The 2015 Computing in Cardiology Conference will be held in the Nice, France, the heart of the French
Riviera, from September 6-9. The meeting is affiliated with the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis and
CNRS.

Here is the scientific program: http://www.cinc2015.org/sites/default/files/fichiers/2015CinCProgramDetails-2.pdf

Click here for final manuscript submissions.

8th Euro Biotechnology Congress August 18-20, 2015 Frankfurt

Omics Conference

24th European Conference on General Thoracic Surgery – İstanbul

ESTS 2016 General Thoracic Surgery Conference will be held between 29 May and 1st June.
Abstract Submissin starts with December. Save the date!
Click for the web site of the conference.

Minerva Medica

2015 North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI) Conference

The North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI) welcomes the submission of original abstracts for its 43rd Annual Meeting, September 26 ? September 29, 2015 at the Westin, San Diego via its online system. The NASCI 2015 Annual Meeting will showcase Oral Presentations, AHA Young Investigator Presentations (AHA Oral), and Educational Exhibits (Poster).

Scientific presentations are completed hypothesis-driven research with a comprehensive report; a work-in-progress report of ongoing research of emerging ideas and techniques and containing initial yet defined results; or a brief pertinent report of a particular new aspect or understanding of clinical radiology.

Young Investigator
The American Heart Association Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention (CVRI) will again sponsor the NASCI-AHA Young Investigator Awards.

Eligibility: All residents, postdoctoral students, medical students, and fellows are eligible.

Selection: Eight finalists will be selected and asked to orally present their papers at the Scientific Sessions. ONLY FIRST AUTHORS MAY PRESENT FOR YOUNG INVESTIGATOR SESSIONS.

Awards: All eight finalists receive two nights’ hotel accommodations at the Westin and will have the abstract published in full in the iJCVI. Travel and meeting registration costs are covered by the finalist. The three top presentations will receive an additional cash award. The 1st place presentation will receive an invitation to publish their work in the iJCVI with an expedited review by the Senior Associate Editor (although standard peer-review criteria for acceptance will apply). If accepted, this article will be noted as NASCI’s 1st place article in an Editorial written by the Senior Associate Editor.

NOTE: Those who submit as an AHA, but are not chosen as a finalist, will still be eligible to present their work as a non-AHA talk or poster.

Application details:

The presenter must be the first author of an accepted abstract.

Only Young Investigator submissions accepted for oral presentation will be considered for the American Heart Association – CVRI Young Investigator Awards.

The applicant must be a member of NASCI and CVRI.

A signed confirmation from the Program Director of the applicant?s In-Training status should be sent to the Society (FAX: 703-716-4487 or EMAIL: info@nasci.org) The applicant must apply before the MAY 19, 2015, 11:59 pm abstract deadline.
No more than two applicants from the same institution may be selected as a Young Investigator finalist. There is no limit to the number that may apply.

When submitting the abstract, please select “Yes” for the Young Investigator Awards/Travel Stipends Question.
The American Heart Association requires all applicants be an AHA CVRI (Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention) Council member. If the applicant is not currently a member of the CVRI council, the CVRI Council will then pay the membership fee.

Submit
About NASCI

LAB SCENES

Congratulations Dr. Fırat Altın

I am very proud to announce that a friend of me is selected for The Medical Doctor of The Year Award in Istanbul.

He is not only a surgeon at the department of pediatric surgery of İstanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Chest & Cardiovascular Surgery Training & Research Hospital but also a PhD candidate at biomedical engineering and a collaborator of some interdisciplinary studies as surgical planning and computational blood flow dynamics.

Congratulations Dr. Altın!